Good Friday Agreement Article 1

Participants in the agreement consisted of two sovereign states (the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland) with armed men and police forces involved in the riots. Two political parties, Sinn Féin and the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP), were linked to paramilitary organisations: the Commissional Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the Ulster Volunteer Force (EIE). The Ulster Democratic Party (UDP), together with the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), had withdrawn from the talks three months earlier. The agreement called for the creation of an independent commission to audit police rules in Northern Ireland, “including ways to promote broad community support” for these agreements. The UK government has also pledged to “carry out a comprehensive review” of the criminal justice system in Northern Ireland. These institutional arrangements, which have been established in these three areas, are defined in the agreement as “interdependent and interdependent”. In particular, it is found that the functioning of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the North-South Council of Ministers is “so closely linked that the success of the other depends on the success of the other”, and participation in the North-South Council of Ministers is “one of the essential tasks related to the relevant posts in [Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland]”. In addition to the number of signatories,[note 1] Stefan Wolff notes the following similarities and differences between the issues addressed in the two agreements:[28] As part of the agreement, the British and Irish governments committed to hold referendums in Northern Ireland and the Republic on 22 May 1998. The referendum in Northern Ireland is expected to approve the deal reached in the multi-party talks. The referendum in the Republic of Ireland is expected to approve the Anglo-Irish Agreement and facilitate the amendment of the Irish Constitution in accordance with the Agreement. The multi-party agreement forced the parties to “use any influence they might have” to secure the dismantling of all paramilitary weapons within two years of referendums to approve the agreement.

The standardisation process forced the British government to reduce the number and role of its armed forces in Northern Ireland “to a level compatible with a normal peaceful society”. These include the removal of security facilities and the lifting of specific emergency powers in Northern Ireland. The Irish Government has undertaken to carry out a “thorough examination” of its breaches of state law. . . .